the HAES® files: History of the Health At Every Size® Movement—The Early 1990s (Part 3)

Health At Every Size® Blog

by Barbara Altman Bruno, Ph.D., LCSW

In response to requests from our readers, the Health At Every Size Blog is honored to reprint Barbara Altman Bruno’s history of the HAES movement. Most of the installments of this history have been previously published in ASDAH member newsletters. This post is Part Three in a series.

The early 1990s looked bad for diet programs and products, and good for the developing anti-diet movement–a term possibly coined by Overcoming Overeating’s Carol Munter in response to a press query.

Canadian Donna Ciliska, responding to the recommendations by Susan and Wayne Wooley in “Should Obesity Be Treated at All?”1, created a psycho-educational, non-dieting program to heal weight-loss obsession in fat women. Her book, Beyond Dieting (New York: Brunner-Mazel) was published in 1990.

Jaclyn Packer’s dissertation, Barriers to Health Care Utilization: The Effect of the Medical Stigma of “Obesity” on Women, was accepted by…

View original post 1,021 more words

the HAES® files: Exploring Food Addiction

Hierdie pas in by wat ek ook dink: Die klein persentasie vet mense wat wel ‘n ongesonde verhouding met kos het, het in daai posisie beland nie as gevolg van te min dieet en worry oor hulle gewig nie, maar juis as gevolg daarvan.

Health At Every Size® Blog

by Marsha Hudnall, MS, RD

Does food addiction really exist?  This question was a big subject of controversy at the national conference of the Binge Eating Disorder Association (BEDA) as well as that of International Association of Eating Disorder Professionals (IAEDP).

Two Sides of the Same Coin

Of those who have strong opinions about the subject, there are probably two sides whose opinions vary the greatest.

There are the researchers who study the issue, most recently via brain scans of larger-bodied folks who fall into the “obese” range of the BMI.  These professionals tend to support the idea of food addiction.

Then there are the dietitians and therapists who use mindful eating (or attuned eating or intuitive eating — all variations on the same theme of normal eating) to help people who struggle with eating and weight.  They tend to question whether food addiction really exists, at least beyond the fact…

View original post 870 more words

the HAES® files: History of the Health At Every Size® Movement—the 1970s & 80s (Part 2)

Health At Every Size® Blog

by Barbara Altman Bruno, Ph.D., LCSW

In response to requests from our readers, the Health At Every Size Blog is honored to reprint Barbara Altman Bruno’s history of the HAES movement. Most of the installments of this history have been previously published in ASDAH member newsletters. This post is Part Two in a series.

The 1970s saw the building of feminism, iconoclasm, introspection, a peace movement regarding Vietnam, and mounting pressure on women to be thinner.

The social construction of weight concerns was examined in different ways by New York and London- based psychotherapist Susie Orbach, a group of women in Los Angeles, and a medical anthropologist in the San Francisco Bay area.

FIFI coverFor Orbach, white, middle-class women’s eating problems were the result of their subordinate status in society. These “compulsive eaters” would get caught up in a repeated diet/binge cycle, which Orbach attributed to their ambivalence. She explored these…

View original post 1,582 more words

Oulik in die botaniese tuin

Oulik-943508243

the HAES® files: A Dietitian’s Road to HAES

Health At Every Size® Blog

by Joanne P. Ikeda, MA, RD

In the early 1990’s, it became apparent to me that we had no successful treatment for obesity. I came to this conclusion because I was very conscientious about reading the scientific literature. One of my myriad job responsibilities as a Nutrition Education Specialist in the Department of Nutritional Sciences at UC Berkeley was to keep abreast of the research and to extend the findings to health professionals if the conclusions had practical application. “If we can’t help large people lose weight, is there anything we can do to help them?” I asked myself.

One of the things that bothered me about research on “obese” people was that it always focused on weight loss. It was as if that was the only thing obesity “experts” cared about. For sure, they didn’t give a damn about the people they were treating. They hardly knew them. These…

View original post 1,271 more words

the HAES® files: International No Diet Day

Health At Every Size® Blog

Supporter INDD

May 6, 2013 marks the 20th anniversary of the first worldwide celebration of International No Diet Day (INDD) – an annual celebration of body acceptance, size diversity and awareness-raising about the harms and misleading promises from the diet industry. Including this year, there have been a total of 22 INDD celebrations, ever since Mary Evans Young started INDD in London in the spring of 1992 following two things: seeing a television program where women were having their stomachs stapled; and a young girl of 15 who committed suicide because ‘she couldn’t cope with being fat’ at a size 14 UK (size 12 US). Mary Evans Young decided that somebody had to stand up and do something — and in the absence of anybody else — she decided it would be her. So she sent out a press release entitled, “Fat Woman Bites Back” and received some media attention. She was desperate…

View original post 165 more words

the HAES® files: History of the Health At Every Size® Movement, Part I

Health At Every Size® Blog

by Barbara Altman Bruno, Ph.D., LCSW

In response to requests from our readers, the Health At Every Size Blog is honored to reprint Barbara Altman Bruno’s history of the HAES movement. Most of the installments of this history have been previously published in ASDAH member newsletters. This post is Part One in a series that will appear in the coming months.

The Health at Every Size (HAES) model exists because of prejudice against extra weight/fatness. This prejudice has occurred quite recently in the history of humans, since a relatively adequate and reliable supply of food has only been available during the past two to three centuries.

Scrutiny of weight only became a growing social issue around the beginning of the 20th century. One of the contributing factors was the development of ready-to-wear clothes, which did not allow for as much individual size variation as had clothing that was hand-tailored…

View original post 1,146 more words